What is Interedition?

Interedition is a COST Action; our aim is to promote the interoperability of the tools and methodology we use in the field of digital scholarly editing and research.

What does that mean?

There are a great many researchers out there in the field of textual scholarship. Some of you have written some amazing computer tools in the course of your research, and others of you could benefit greatly if these tools were openly available. The primary purpose of Interedition is to facilitate this contact—to encourage the creators of tools for textual scholarship to make their functionality available to others, and to promote communication between scholars so that we can raise awareness of innovative working methods.

Why should we do that?

Lack of IT capacity and sustainability are major threats to the continuity of our digital research sources, tools, and results. We want to network as much digital effort in our field as possible to create a common strong, supportive, interoperated mesh of our technologies that will eventually self sustain.

LLC Publication Out

On Thursday 20 March 2014 an important publication that sprouted in part as a result of Interedition was published in Literary and Linguistic Computing: Computer-supported collation of modern manuscripts: CollateX and the Beckett Digital Manuscript Project. In the article the developers of CollateX and researchers involved with Interedition elaborate on computational approaches to text collation.

From the abstract

Interoperability is the key term within the framework of the European-funded research project Interedition whose aim is ‘to encourage the creators of tools for textual scholarship to make their functionality available to others, and to promote communication between scholars so that we can raise awareness of innovative working methods’. The tools developed by Interedition’s ‘Prototyping’ working group were tested by other research teams, which formulate strategic recommendations. To this purpose, the Centre for Manuscript Genetics (University of Antwerp), the Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands (The Hague), and the University of Würzburg have been working together within the framework of Interedition. One of the concrete results of collaboration is the development and fine-tuning of the text collation tool CollateX.

For the full article refer to
http://llc.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/03/19/llc.fqu007.short?rss=1.